A statue of Fred Harris? And other tidbits

  • Sasaki Associates now has a page for its House Centers "pilot" program. This SCUP article has a "housing swarm" image that Sasaki created for Dartmouth. A Valley News article states that the college "estimated it will cost $12.8 million to build professors' residences and temporary centers for Dartmouth's Undergraduate House Communities program." But those have already been built. Presumably that estimate refers to completed construction. Any future, permanent versions of those buildings will cost a lot more than $13 million.

  • BBB has updated its page on the campus master plan to include a large version of that plan, an image of the West End plan (Green to Blue), and -- this is new -- a schematic perspective rendering of the cemetery bridge, which we can call Fletcher Viaduct.

  • This Valley News article notes Kendal's interest in building to the south on Rivercrest land and leaving the Chieftain land for recreation (rowing).

  • Sir John Soane's Museum in London has a computer model of the museum on line.

  • The architects have completed a design for the Irving Institute (Valley News).

  • The Dartmouth has an article on the success of the Town fence in front of Collis in reducing jaywalking.

  • The Hood has a brochure on public art on campus. The Class of 1965 has proposed to erect a statue of DOC founder Fred Harris in front of Robinson Hall. The campus architecture committee is considering the idea, according to the '65 newsletter.

  • A bit of biography on David Hooke, who's at the center of the new Moosilauke Ravine Lodge.

  • Dartmouth will play Brown at football in Fenway Park on November 10, Big Green Alert reports. Wild.

  • The Rauner Library Blog has a post about the Charter.

  • Kresge Library in Fairchild has turned 40 years old.

  • This Times editorial contains footnotes. Kinda neat, but also showy: if footnotes are needed here, why not everywhere? Or if the paper is to be relied on generally, why include notes here?

  • Big Green Alert points out the new use of the Lone Pine logo by the Co-Op. First impression? The trad typeface clashes with the fat Modernism of the pine. The use of the athletics nickname BIG GREEN in this seal-like, college-wide institutional device is also weird.

  • A Proliferation of Canes. Photos of the most recent Commencement show students carrying many strange, new-ish canes, most presumably representing senior societies. They feature a snake wrapped around a Native American arrow; a bearded old man; the domed main body of Shattuck Observatory (clever!); a snake clutching an apple in its mouth; a huge phoenix (for Phoenix, obviously -- is that cast resin or something?); a tail, perhaps belonging to a whale?; and a three-dimensional stylization of the stylized Lone Pine symbol (also a metal globe).

  • Two interesting new-ish concepts: literary geography and forensic architecture.

Continue reading


Image of new Ledyard; selecting Ravine Lodge timbers


Co-Op Food Store in Centerra

---------

11.28.2016 update: DEN project page link added.

Continue reading


Prefab sprout space?

Many of the six Residence Communities (a post here) need dwellings for their resident House Professors and spaces that will host social gatherings. The school has a master plan by Sasaki Associates, $11.75m to work with, and a deadline of Fall Term 2016.

Thus it makes sense that representatives of the college and Sasaki would pay a visit to MIT to view modular buildings constructed by Triumph Modular. The handout from the visit on April 20 contains a proposed timeline: if design work ends by August 15, occupancy could begin on December 31.

Dartmouth has a long history with modular buildings. The most notable ones were the leftover WWII shipyard workers' housing units that became Wigwam Circle, where the River Cluster and Whittemore Green are now. (If memory serves, those buildings became the basis for Rivercrest, up past CRREL.) On a portion of the same site, Dartmouth placed the five Tree Houses in 2001. Every institution that uses "temporary" buildings becomes dependent on the space they provide and finds it hard to remove the buildings at the allotted time.

The buildings in Triumph's broad lineup, while modular, are not necessarily temporary.

Continue reading


Building projects budgeted for; other news

  • The Town budget includes funding for construction of walk/bike path along Lyme Road to the Reservoir Road roundabout. The paved path will be separated from the road by a tree lawn (The Dartmouth).

  • Tri-Kap appears finally to be tackling its Fuller Audit improvements, planning to erect an addition designed by Domus Custom Builders (Zoning Board minutes 22 January 2015 pdf).

  • Earlier this year, the Hood Quarterly reported that work on the museum's addition and renovation would begin during the Spring of 2016.1"Anonymous $10 Million Gift Will Transform Teaching at the Hood Museum of Art," Hood Museum of Art Quarterly (Winter 2015), 10, available at http://hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu/docs/2015webreadyquarterly.pdf. The college trustees met last week and approved a capital budget that includes $8.5 million "for completion of design and preconstruction activities for the Hood Museum of Art renewal and expansion project" (Dartmouth Now). The Hood project, by Tod Williams Billie Tsien, "is being coordinated with a Hopkins Center for the Arts planning study" by Boora Architects.

  • Also in the new capital budget (Dartmouth Now) are:

    - Funds for the planning and design of a restoration project for Baker Tower.

    - "$11.75 million for design and construction of facilities related to initial work on the configuration of new residential housing communities." That is likely work by Sasaki Associates, with the funding presumably going to build something less than the total number of dining-hall additions, faculty houses, or other "neighborhood" improvements the firm is proposing.

    - "$100,000 for planning and conceptual design for the Ledyard Canoe Club replacement project." The growth of mold in the clubhouse has sealed its fate; the designer of the replacement has not been named.

    - "$200,000 for schematic design for renovation of Moosilauke Ravine Lodge." After Maclay Architects studied the feasibility of preserving or replacing the Lodge, it was not known which route the board would take. Maclay even sketched a design for a possible replacement. Now it seems that the Lodge is going to be preserved.

  • The Planner's Blog mentions that there are more than 42 types of bollard on campus. Almost as impressive is the fact that all the bollards have been cataloged and are being evaluated in a critical way.

  • Dartmouth Now has a nice post on the Book Arts Workshop in Baker.2Hannah Silverstein, "Book Arts Workshop: Hands-On Learning, Global Reach," Dartmouth Now (25 February 2015), at
    http://now.dartmouth.edu/2015/02/book-arts-workshop-hands-on-learning-global-reach/.

  • The feasibility study for that future Mass Row renovation was conducted a couple of years ago by Lawson Bell Architects.

  • Miller Chevrolet Cadillac, down on Route 120 not far from Fort Harry's, has been sold, and its site is to be redeveloped:

    Although Cicotte declined to identify the buyer, she said it wasn't a hotel developer, Dartmouth College, or Hanover developer Jay Campion. The Miller Chevrolet Cadillac property, which is accessed on Labombard Road, is adjacent to the New Hampshire National Guard Armory on Heater Road. The property is also next to a planned hotel and conference center under review by Lebanon planning authorities, and near a natural gas depot under development by Campion.

    One possible buyer mentioned is Dartmouth Coach, which has a facility on nearby Etna Road.

    (Valley News). If I'm not mistaken, Miller is the dealership that eventually acquired Rodgers' Garage, the REO/Packard/Chevrolet dealer on Lebanon Street where the VAC now stands.

  • That natural gas project is by Campion's Valley Green Natural Gas, which plans to transfer gas from tanker trucks on Route 120 and then send it by pipeline to Hanover, particularly to Dartmouth (Valley News 18 May 2014, 4 November 2014). Dartmouth will finish analyzing a possible fuel switch this fall (Valley News).

----------------------------

Notes   [ + ]

1. "Anonymous $10 Million Gift Will Transform Teaching at the Hood Museum of Art," Hood Museum of Art Quarterly (Winter 2015), 10, available at http://hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu/docs/2015webreadyquarterly.pdf.
2. Hannah Silverstein, "Book Arts Workshop: Hands-On Learning, Global Reach," Dartmouth Now (25 February 2015), at
http://now.dartmouth.edu/2015/02/book-arts-workshop-hands-on-learning-global-reach/.

Continue reading


Alas, Rivercrest

Wolff Lyons' expansive traditionalist neighborhood plan (a post here) for the redevelopment of Rivercrest, on hold for several years, will not be built when the land is finally developed:

Tim McNamara from the Dartmouth College Real Estate Office explained that the College was instrumental in the zoning change creating the GR-4 district. A Master Plan for a suburban village had been created for Rivercrest with 300 mixed type housing units. The project has been on hold due to the recession and wanting to be patient about the transport of TCE from CRREL.

The College will soon determine what the housing demand is considering faculty and graduate students. The Rivercrest project will be designed based on this demand. The current Master Plan is unlikely to be built. When the College finally initiates Rivercrest, it is unlikely to be built out quickly. Tim envisions many smaller phases. If it were put in the queue today for planning, construction would occur in 3- 5 years. The actual start depends on demand at Dartmouth, the availability of capital and the TCE situation.1Planning Board, minutes of meeting (4 June 2014), pdf, 5.

We also learn that "Sachem will be built out first as that housing is needed for graduate students. There are no plans for the golf course."

----

Notes   [ + ]

1. Planning Board, minutes of meeting (4 June 2014), pdf, 5.

Continue reading


Kendal, sprawling onto the Chieftain property?

Banwell Architects has a page noting their work with architects RLPS on the Kendal master plan.

In the image provided, a random scatter of foreground parking lots is ornamented by several identical new buildings. The designers are dealing with a lot of topography; but still, this design lacks the coherence or focus of the existing Kendal complex.

Continue reading


A new master plan for CRREL

This is impressive and fairly unexpected: an Oregon firm called The Urban Collaborative has helped design a master plan and building code for CRREL.

Here's a recent aerial of the site from Google Maps:

Master planning started back in 2010 (see Public Works Digest pdf). The Army bought from Dartmouth the bulk of the land beneath its labs during 2012 (post).

The development next door to the north of CRREL is Rivercrest, which is owned by the college and has a thoughtful New Urbanist master plan of its own (post). Progress on that redevelopment has been halted for several years, and the plan lives only on paper.

Perhaps the two institutions can jointly reduce the suburbanity of the area by connecting each of their grids to the other. The CRREL plan even depicts, perhaps optimistically, a grand boulevard running west from Lyme Road toward the river, lined on one side with a new CRREL signature building and on the other with commercial blocks not previously shown in the Rivercrest plan. (Connections to Kendal to the north are probably too much to ask, however.)

Continue reading


Kendal is buying the Chieftain

The Valley News reports that Kendal at Hanover will purchase the Chieftain Motor Inn (see also The Dartmouth. As the News reports, the fondly-recalled 23-room motel was built during the early 1950s on a 10.7-acre parcel along the River just beyond what is now the Kendal continuing-care retirement community:


-----
[Update 11.11.2013: Broken link to the Chieftain removed.]
[Update 04.07.2013: Link to The Dartmouth added.]

Continue reading


Varied topics

Hanover's elms always make an interesting topic (Valley News).

Dartmouth's Flickr photostream provides some unusual views, including a shot of the Borwell Research Building entrance, the recently remade memorial garden by the Hop, and the Dartmouth Cup, which was made in 1848 by the Crown Jeweler.

The tech incubator in Centerra, the Dartmouth Regional Technology Center, plans to expand using state and federal grants (Valley News; The Dartmouth).

Rivercrest plans have been moved back, and Dartmouth hopes to put modular houses on the site (Valley News).

The Life Sciences project page has some new information, but the best gauge of progress is the webcam. The building is beginning to take shape. This is a very long project that will not end until August 2011 (Capital Projects Schedule [pdf]).

-----
[Update 11.17.2012: Broken link to webcam removed.]

Continue reading


New Co-Op Food Store by the roundabout

The replacement Co-Op Food Store on Lyme Road opened in December (Valley News, store photo gallery).

There has been little news on the proposal to totally redevelop the nearby Rivercrest (preliminary site plan, Wolff Lyon Architects' page), and this, too, is probably delayed by the downturn.

-----
[Update 07.06.2013: Broken link to photo gallery removed.]
[Update 06.13.2009: Trumbull-Nelson's magazine has a story on the Co-Op Food Store.]

Continue reading


Keystone for the Rivercrest Roundabout: The Co-Op Food Store

Trumbull-Nelson has demolished the old Co-Op Food Store and gas station at the intersection of Lyme and Reservoir Roads. The Co-Op is building a replacement on the site (more info) designed by UK Architects of Hanover; the minutes of the Planning Board (pdf) indicate that the landscape architects are ORW Landscape Architects & Planners of Norwich.

The new store, which will not contain a gas station, will face the traffic circle at the intersection and will complement Dartmouth's Rivercrest redevelopment across Lyme Road, forming a part of what is in essence a new town north of the golf course.

-----
[Update 07.06.2013: Broken link to more Co-Op info removed, broken link to replacement store replaced.]
[Update 12.02.2012: Broken link to 16 October 2007 Planning Board minutes removed.]
[Update 11.17.2012: Broken link to demolition article removed.]

Continue reading


Walkability

The College's real estate arm has posted news of its large New-Urbanist housing redevelopment up by the Rugby Clubhouse and Pat & Tony's. It will take the name of the prior housing tract of the early 1960s, Rivercrest.

According to a list by City-Data.com, the cities over 5,000 people with the highest percentage of people walking to work are (predictably) small places centered around a military base, a college, or some combination of the two:

1. West Point, N.Y. (pop. 7,138): 57.7%
2. Air Force Academy, Colo. (pop. 7,526): 56.3%
3. Fort Gordon, Ga. (pop. 7,754): 53.0%
4. Twentynine Palms Base, Cal. (housing, pop. 8,413): 48.0%
5. Lackland AFB, Tex. (pop. 7,123): 47.4%
6. Hanover, N.H. (pop. 8,162): 47.2%

The list lends support to the general sense that city planning conducted by a relatively authoritarian central body creates superior places.

In some ways it is surprising to see Hanover on the list, since the story of Dartmouth's growth over the last 30 years is that of faculty moving out, the "Hanoverizing" of Lyme and Norwich, the creation of school-supported suburbs such as Centerra and Grasse Road, and so on.

(Other tidbits from the website's lists: The towns in the four zip codes with the lowest crime are named Sleepy Hollow, Pleasantville, Economy, and Prospect. The city over 50,000 with the lowest average temperature is Anchorage, at 34.3 degrees F, which handily beats Duluth and Fargo and a surprising number of cities in Arizona. It is probably a quirk of the zip code divisions in Fairbanks that prevents that city from appearing on the list.)

Continue reading


Rivercrest gets go-ahead

The Dartmouth reports that the College and the Hospital will begin their complete redevelopment of Rivercrest. The old late-1950s housing development out by Kendal was the conceptual if not actual heir of the World War II shipyard housing used in Wigwam Circle, by the River Cluster. Although the project has sometimes gone by the name "Dresden Village," it looks as if it will keep "Rivercrest." Almost 300 people will live there, the Valley News reports.

The plan is one developed by Wolff Lyon Architects in 2004 (previous post). The Real Estate Office has a page that will provide a site plan and other information.

Continue reading


Where is Sand Hill?

Landscape architects Winston Associates announced during 2004 that Dartmouth had selected Winston and Wolff-Lyon to plan a 200-unit Sand Hill neighborhood that would include an integrated parking/transit transfer center.

Sand Hill does not seem to be a prominent landmark in Hanover or Lebanon. A Parking Committee Recommendation describes Sand Hill as an undeveloped site with room for 450 parking spaces, while the OPDC parking spreadsheet (Excel file) indicates that 300 new parking spots are expected to open in the Sand Hill Lot during fiscal year 2007.

-----
[Update 11.17.2012: Broken link to Winston link really fixed.]
[Update 11.12.2012: Broken Winston link fixed.]

Continue reading


Wolff Lyon’s master plan for Rivercrest (2004)

The Boulder-based firm of Wolff Lyon Architects, which developed some of the guidelines for the massive redevelopment of Denver's Stapleton Airport as a town, worked with Boulder landscape architects Winston Associates to complete a master plan for Dartmouth's total reconstruction of its suburban Rivercrest housing development, north of CRREL and south of Kendal. This project, also known as Dresden Village in planning documents, seems to be taking a while in the town's regulatory process.

(More on the firm from Wellington in Breckenridge, Colo. Is it coincidence that the master planner for Kendal at Hanover, adjacent Rivercrest, is another Boulder firm, Architecture Incorporated?)

-----
[Update 11.17.2012: Broken link to Winston really fixed.]
[Update 11.12.2012: Broken links to Winston and Wellington fixed.]
[Update 01.25.2007 Update: Winston link added.]

Continue reading