A new direction for the old Heating Plant

Introduction
The college announced recently that it won't upgrade its Heating Plant from No. 6 fuel oil to natural gas but will instead skip directly to a more sustainable source of energy.1Charlotte Albright, "President Hanlon: Big Green Will Go (More) Green," Dartmouth News (22 April 2017); Aimee Caruso, "Dartmouth Plans to Cut Oil Reliance," Valley News (23 April 2017). That energy source is likely to be biomass.3Rob Wolfe, "New Dartmouth Task Force Will Help School Go Green," Valley News (31 August 2016); Peter Charalambous, "College to finalize heating and energy proposals," The Dartmouth (3 February 2017); Wolfe, "Fueling a College's Future," Valley News (27 April 2017). Because a biomass plant will require a lot of land on which to store piles of wood chips for combustion, the site of the current Heating Plant south of Wheelock Street will not do.2Wolfe, "Fueling a College's Future."

The new plant

The college is mum on where the new heating plant will be built, but Dewey Field must be at the top of the list of possibilities. Dewey Field is a large, open site on Route 10 (Lyme Road) that is currently used as a parking lot. Most of the field is located outside the 10-minute walking radius that is supposed to define the limits of the campus proper. The field also is close to the northern end of the tunnel network that currently carries steam lines to the various buildings. Some posts on this site have speculated about the idea of putting a new heating plant in Dewey Field: here, here, and especially here.

Dewey Field aerial at Google Maps.

(Unfortunately for the college, Dewey Field is also close to the mansions of Rope Ferry Road. Would it be possible to locate a biomass plant on the other side of Lyme Road, up by the Corey Ford Rugby Clubhouse? Or would the inefficiency created by the long distance be too great?)

Wherever the school sites the new plant, it should be encouraged to hire an outside architect with vision. The northern gateway to Hanover is not the place for a brown, metal-sided box. While the plant at Hotchkiss might not be right for Hanover, it stands next to a golf course. It was designed by Centerbrook with civil engineering by Milone & MacBroom, both firms that have worked at Dartmouth.

Since a heating plant is a simple industrial building, it can be covered in anything. Here is an amazing plant in the Netherlands that is clad in Delft tiles.

The old plant

Heating Plant, Meacham photo

The Heating Plant.

The old Heating Plant is one of the better examples of historic preservation at the college.

The ground level of the plant was built as a one-story Romanesque building in 1898 (Lamb & Rich, Architects). The second level was added by the college's other important architectural firm, Larson & Wells, in 1923. In more recent history, each time the college has placed a new boiler in the building, it has dismantled a front facade bay and then built it back again — three times, in three different bays.

This website cannot stop talking about the importance of preserving the old exhaust stack, a fundamental Hanover landmark — it is an axial terminus for Lebanon Street — and an historic symbol of the traditional function of this neighborhood as Hanover's energy district. Yale's master plan devotes one map to showing "major vertical objects,"4Yale Master Plan pdf, 94. and this stack is one of the three most important vertical objects in Hanover. It makes no difference that the stack, built in 1958, is not "original" to the building, whatever that means for this evolving industrial structure. The stack is simply too important. It satisfies the 50-year threshold to be considered "historic" under the Secretary of the Interior's Standards anyway. (And it goes without saying that Harry A. Wells's wonderfully adaptable 1916 Store House on Crosby Street, seen in Google Street View, also must be retained.)

The stack as seen from Lebanon Street.

The old plant in the future

Old power plants are reused all the time: see "Adaptive Reuse for Power Plants by Studio Gang and Adjaye Associates"5Aaron Wiener, "Adaptive Reuse for Power Plants by Studio Gang and Adjaye Associates," Architect Magazine (1 December 2013). and the Bruner/Cott renovation of Amherst's 1925 power house. The only natural move would be for the college to expand the Hood Museum into the empty plant building.

The old stack should become a victory column. Or the school could install a staircase and top the column with a Classical decorative element, such as the golden flaming urn of Wren's 1677 Monument to the Great Fire of London (Wikipedia) or William Whitfield's 2003 Paternoster Square column, seen in Google Street View (that one was built as a ventilation shaft, Wikipedia notes). Or imagine commissioning a statue or an abstract sculpture as a new signpost for the arts at Dartmouth — and for the college as a whole.

Notes   [ + ]

1. Charlotte Albright, "President Hanlon: Big Green Will Go (More) Green," Dartmouth News (22 April 2017); Aimee Caruso, "Dartmouth Plans to Cut Oil Reliance," Valley News (23 April 2017).
2. Wolfe, "Fueling a College's Future."
3. Rob Wolfe, "New Dartmouth Task Force Will Help School Go Green," Valley News (31 August 2016); Peter Charalambous, "College to finalize heating and energy proposals," The Dartmouth (3 February 2017); Wolfe, "Fueling a College's Future," Valley News (27 April 2017).
4. Yale Master Plan pdf, 94.
5. Aaron Wiener, "Adaptive Reuse for Power Plants by Studio Gang and Adjaye Associates," Architect Magazine (1 December 2013).

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And if you want, they’ll bring it right up to your room

By now you'll have heard the news that Everything But Anchovies has closed (Valley News). The restaurant opened on Allen Street in 1979.

The October 2016 edition of the menu is still on line (pdf) and shows such familiar dishes as the Chicken Sandwich (on a Portuguese muffin, never my thing), the Pasta Alfredo, and the Tuscany Bread (did the delivery drivers really make the garlic bread while they were waiting to hop into an early-eighties Chevette with an armful of orders?). The Southwestern Burrito does not seem to be there any more; I went through a phase in 93X where I ordered one or two of those every week. Opening the white styrofoam clamshell would reveal a placid ocean of salsa, refried beans, and shredded lettuce. One had to fish around in the depths to pinpoint the location of the burrito.

The EBAs building is historic, designed by Larson & Wells and built by W.H. Trumbull in 1921.1"Building and Construction News Section," The American Contractor 42:14 (2 April 1921), 67. It was originally a garage, as these photos from Frank Barrett's books show:




The second story and the brick facing are obviously much later. The image above is from Google Street View.

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Notes   [ + ]

1. "Building and Construction News Section," The American Contractor 42:14 (2 April 1921), 67.

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Moosilauke Ravine Lodge construction continues

  • David Kotz has some nice photos of the construction of the new Ravine Lodge.

  • The Rauner Library Blog has a post on the great railroad artist Howard Fogg '38.

  • Spotted this flag at a Richmond, Virginia, area high school:

    Photo of flag at Freeman High, Richmond VA by Meacham

    The star recalls the WWII Army Air Force insignia or the Chrysler Pentastar of the Eighties. Or it could be a battlefield map depicting a star fort surrounded by infantry units. The variety of bar widths is unusual. Flags of the World explains that it is "an official symbol of remembrance of September 11th" and that when it is hoisted vertically, the wide bars are meant to be seen as the Twin Towers.

    It turns out that the flag's designer owns a restaurant very close to the school, and that he has also designed a monument to the flag (in the shape of the flag, hoisted vertically) for a traffic island nearby. "Given that it is the home of the Freedom Flag, Henrico County is the natural choice for the location of the Freedom Flag Monument and Virginia 9/11 Memorial."

  • Dartmouth Now seems to have changed its name to Dartmouth News.

  • Other college buildings based on Independence Hall are found at Brooklyn College:


    and Westminster Choir College in Princeton, N.J. (see the Google Earth 3D image).

  • Amherst has chosen as its mascot the Mammoth. The blurb explaining the Mammoth proposal notes that "The Beneski Museum of Natural History famously displays the skeleton of a Columbian mammoth, unearthed by Professor Frederick Brewster Loomis and brought to the College in 1925." Museum specimens always provide good mascot options. Dartmouth's museum displayed both a stuffed zebra and a set of curious elephant (i.e. mammoth) bones during the late eighteenth century.

  • The University of Virginia is celebrating its 200th anniversary and will feature bicentennial-logo zipper pulls on this year's graduation gowns.

  • The city of Krakow has a new logo in the form of a city plan.

  • Last year the New York Times published interactive articles on mapping the shadows of New York and which existing Manhattan buildings could not be built today.

  • A Times obituary of March 13 noted the passing of the architectural historian and author of the Streetscapes column Christopher Gray. I was never able to meet him, but I was honored to have my site mentioned in his column on Lamb & Rich, and I enjoyed visiting the Office for Metropolitan History to do research in his compilations of 19th-century Times building permit notices (now they are in an online database provided by OMH, an amazing resource). The New Yorker ran an article about how Gray had left his skeleton to his school, St. Paul's. What a character --

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Planning the western part of campus

In September the college released a framework plan for potential construction around the professional schools (news release, story in The D). The plan, by Beyer Blinder Belle, elaborates on that firm's earlier master plan for the campus.

The plan shows several future buildings. One is the upcoming Thayer School/Computer Science building, on the site of the Thayer parking lot (new images released). Another is the Irving Institute building in front of the Murdough Center (some details released). The designer of the Irving Institute is KPMB Architects, a Canadian firm: the school's press release notes that each of the firm's three partners is a member or officer of the Order of Canada. The plan also shows the demolition of the final two River Cluster dormitories, although the school has not selected a site for the replacement beds yet.

It is good to hear that the planning involves the "consideration of the aesthetics of future buildings and improvements to signage." The future buildings depicted in the plan image do seem to perpetuate the oddly suburban bias noted in the original BBB master plan, however.

Lisa Hogarty, at the time the Vice President of Campus Planning (The D), said that "This plan creates a route from the Green to the river and adds new community green space." The new route to the River is shown in the illustration and includes a ped-bike bridge over the cemetery. The "new community green space" is presumably an improvement of the existing "Whittemore Green" behind Thayer School. Some work has been done here, but it still feels a bit like leftover space, the grassy area in the middle of the asphalt turnaround.

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Some campus photos and notes

Steam Tunnel access grate on the Green, Google Street View

Steam Tunnel access under Green, Meacham photo

Steam Tunnel access grate on the Green, underside

The first stage of the steam tunnel's construction, south of this grate, was a test meant to determine whether such a project would be economical in a ledge environment.

image

North bank of HBs at former entrance to Hop, view to west

Until recently, students entered the Hop at the end of the room. The entrance was closed off and a replacement of the same configuration built just to the north.

Hop interior at Minary entrance, Meacham photo

The new Hop entrance, view to northwest onto Zahm/Memorial Garden

(Have the memorial plaques attached to the Inn there been moved to Memorial Field? That would make sense. This is not their first location anyway.)

Triangle House, Meacham photo

Triangle House entrance (west) facade

Even more than the society houses on the south side of Webster Avenue, Triangle House has a well-used student entrance on one side, shown here, and a formal street entrance on the other.

LSC bike pavilion, Meacham photo

LSC bike pavilion

This elaborate bicycle shelter for the Life Sciences Center joins a couple other pavilions in the area.

Gilman plaque, Meacham photo

Plaque moved from Gilman to LSC

LSC name lettering, Meacham photo

The town changed the street address of the building to get it to match.

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Cemetery viaduct to be built

The Valley News reports that Hanover residents voted on Tuesday for the zoning amendment that the college had requested as part of a project related to Thayer School expansion.

Residents also approved an amendment that would allow development near or in a cemetery in some circumstances. The official zoning amendment proposal form (pdf) supplies this detail:

Providing direct pedestrian access from the parking structure and Thayer campus to the College's administrative offices, Mass Row, 53 Commons and downtown is desirable to the Town and College. In order to accommodate an elevated pedestrian walkway, construction of footings [in the Dartmouth Cemetery] is anticipated.

While the former parking deck idea is not a part of this zoning change, a parking structure certainly would be an important terminus for such a viaduct. The Planning Board minutes of 2 February 2016 (pdf), written back when the parking deck was a hot topic, say:

A pathway is also proposed from a proposed parking facility to the Green, to enhance connectivity of the west campus to the main campus, and to provide easy off-highway access from the proposed parking facility to the Green.

Aha. The viaduct that Larson proposed during the late 1920s, shown on his 1928 master plan, looks set to become a reality. (See also the Westway proposal here.)

Detail of Larson 1928 master plan

Detail of 1928 plan with viaduct lined in red

The map associated with the zoning amendment gives a general idea of the route of the new work, with the viaduct shown as a dashed orange line through the cemetery:

Planning Board map from April 2016 video

Map from "Hanover Planning Board Changes April 2016" video at 9:37 mark

The viaduct presumably will be an extension of Cemetery Lane, the road known until relatively recently as Sanborn Lane. (The map above also shows the realignment of the bottom of Engineering Drive at West Wheelock Street and the reconfiguration of the turnaround at the end of Tuck Mall.)




Keats and Yeats are on your side; Street View image from Google.

The cemetery gate, minus the unfortunately-located parking signage, would make a nice entrance to the viaduct. Here's hoping the bridge is a work of the engineer's art worthy of this historic place and its Classical monuments of carved stone. Wilson Architects, the firm that appears to be designing the Thayer building, designed a set of impressive campus pedestrian bridges at Vanderbilt University (a view of one, a view of another).

This will not be the first bridge in the cemetery: during the early 1880s, the cemetery association spanned the northern ravine with a timber bridge. It shows up on this 1890 map and a photo was reproduced in Dartmouth Now. It became unsafe and was removed by the 1920s.

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[Update 05.16.2016: Reference to Dartmouth Now added and historic bridge re-described as being of timber, not iron.]

[Update 05.12.2016: Note about dashed orange line added.]

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The plaques are back at Memorial Field

The rededication of the memorial plaques that had been returned or relocated to Memorial Field took place last weekend (Alumni Relations press release, Events notice).

The green wall on which the various plaques are mounted faces westward from behind the brick arches of the West Stands. A new circular logo-like relief sculpture by Dimitri Gerakaris '69 bearing the motto "THE HILL WIND KNOWS THEIR NAME"1The phrase is a reference to a line in the "Alma Mater," which is a version of the poem "Men of Dartmouth" ("The still North remembers them, / The hill-winds know their name, / And the granite of New Hampshire / Keeps the record of their fame."). Richard Hovey, "Men of Dartmouth," in H.J. Hapgood and Craven Laycock, eds., Echoes from Dartmouth (Hanover, N.H., 1895), 12. is an organizing feature; it was donated by the Sphinx Foundation.2The Foundation, of whose board Gerakaris has been a member, maintains the Sphinx Tomb. Its other purposes include being a "reservoir" of college history and preserving the educational ceremonies of the Sphinx (it conducts a "formal annual course on Dartmouth and Sphinx history and tradition" for members). Getting good Internet access through the poured-concrete walls of the tomb must be tough, and indeed one of the group's accomplishments is the maintenance of "the building's wireless and high speed conductivity to ensure the Sphinx Building provides the strongest support for undergraduate academic activities." Those activities include using the library and study stations and engaging in "extensive peer driven learning experiences" (2013 Form 990 PDF). Gerakaris, of Canaan, is the sculptor of the rugby relief on the chimney breast in the Rugby Clubhouse.

The Big Green Alert Blog has a photo of each plaque. The post-1920s plaques were moved here from elsewhere. For pre-1920s plaques, visit Webster Hall, where an Alumni Association plaque lists the 73 Civil War dead and a Class of 1863 plaque lists the 56 class members who served in the Civil War. The two plaques were installed in 1914, about six years after Webster Hall was finished.

Dartmouth does not seem to have a war memorial for any earlier war, and Charles T. Wood's The Hill Winds Know Their Name (pdf) does not list any. Dartmouth certainly could have a monument to past and future college students and officers who fought in the Revolution; students of Moor's Charity School are actually more prominent in that war than are Dartmouth students, and at least one (Joseph Brant) took part in both the French & Indian War and the Revolutionary War.

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Notes   [ + ]

1. The phrase is a reference to a line in the "Alma Mater," which is a version of the poem "Men of Dartmouth" ("The still North remembers them, / The hill-winds know their name, / And the granite of New Hampshire / Keeps the record of their fame."). Richard Hovey, "Men of Dartmouth," in H.J. Hapgood and Craven Laycock, eds., Echoes from Dartmouth (Hanover, N.H., 1895), 12.
2. The Foundation, of whose board Gerakaris has been a member, maintains the Sphinx Tomb. Its other purposes include being a "reservoir" of college history and preserving the educational ceremonies of the Sphinx (it conducts a "formal annual course on Dartmouth and Sphinx history and tradition" for members). Getting good Internet access through the poured-concrete walls of the tomb must be tough, and indeed one of the group's accomplishments is the maintenance of "the building's wireless and high speed conductivity to ensure the Sphinx Building provides the strongest support for undergraduate academic activities." Those activities include using the library and study stations and engaging in "extensive peer driven learning experiences" (2013 Form 990 PDF).

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Here’s to the Polka Dot; other topics

  • The Valley News has an article with some superb photographs on the Polka Dot Restaurant by the tracks in White River Junction. The 1925 building seems to have hosted a diner from the beginning; owner Mary Shatney started working there in 1959 and had to close the place last year. It's up for sale -- let's hope it remains a restaurant.

  • The Dartmouth Energy Program site is very impressive. In the history section, the excellent photo of the coal assistant seems to have been taken from the east end of the hall looking west. The narrow-gauge rails lead toward the coal hopper in the end of the building, now the site of the Hood Museum's Bernstein Study-Storage Center. A couple of quibbles: first, "the good old days" actually began in 1770, not 1769; second, the timeline could mention the major addition of a second level to the building in 1922, apparently when the plant switched from coal to oil; and third, there's something off about the wording of this sentence on the main page, however technically correct it might be: "While Dartmouth may be the smallest Ivy League university, we're doing big things with energy efficiency."

  • Excellent photo documentation of the construction of the West Stands continues at the Big Green Alert: April 24, April 23, April 22, April 19, April 18 (notable photos), April 8, April 7 (seating chart), March 23, and March 16.

  • The photo in the Valley News story on spring practice makes Memorial Field look as if it occupies an industrial wasteland. The runway at which Memorial Field's concrete risers were stored for about six years, incidentally, was known as Miller Airport (Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields).

  • Victor Mair '65 at Language Log takes on the word "schlump," of "schlump season," i.e. "mud season" ("breakup" in Alaska).

  • The Rauner Library Blog has interesting posts on the petition of Ledyard and others to be allowed to learn to dance and use the sword and a mysterious photo album called Along the Connecticut 1912.

  • The Watershed Studio website features several notable projects, including the Friends of Hanover Crew boathouse, the Organic Farm greenhouse, and a design for the replacement Ledyard Canoe Club.

  • Maybe the real test for the Residential Communities (a post here) will be the Commencement ceremony. Will the Communities be represented in the procession? The graduates will still have to march in alphabetical order, but will the House Professors carry the house emblems?

  • The West Wheelock Gateway District proposal is up for a vote and has been getting some press (Valley News, The Dartmouth). The VN story has this neat tidbit:

    Around the corner from Anderson, William Smalley owns a small white house sandwiched between rental buildings mostly filled with Dartmouth students.

    In an interview Monday at his home, where he has lived since 1938, Smalley said he welcomed the creation of the district and didn’t mind the parties the students occasionally threw.

    "Somebody said to me, 'How can you stand them?'" he said of the students, but "I’ve never had a problem with them — never."

  • The college's Flickr account has a neat and unusual view of Dartmouth Row, Ascutney, Richardson, and the Wilder addition. See the photo of the graffiti inside the Bartlett Tower roof. The structure does not look particularly original (1895) but there are graffiti from 1910 and 1915, so perhaps it is.

  • The Hanover Master Plan (pdf) contains a number of interesting tidbits, including this one: "The Town's boundary stones and monuments are also historic landmarks. Most have the first letters of the adjacent towns incised in them."

  • "In devising the plan of the library building, you have contemplated its indefinite extension to meet the growth of the collections," said Mellen Chamberlain at the dedication of Wilson Hall as the school library (Google Books).

  • "Areas of potential historic interest include theoriginal center of Town; the well field of the old Aqueduct Company south of the Greensboro Road; the Granite Quarry south of Greensboro Road; the Tilton Quarry east of Moose Mountain Road and one of the earliest slate quarries on the old Tisdale property" (Hanover Master Plan pdf).

  • Finding churches that have been put to interesting new uses is just too easy, so further examples will not be added to the post here that arguing that Rollins should be turned into a library. There is a pub in a former church in Nottingham, England, and a brewery and pub in a former church in Pittsburgh, where a Romanesque nave makes an impressive beer hall.

  • The Hanover Master Plan (pdf) also recommends National Register listing for various districts including the campus.

  • This has probably been posted here before, but Yale has construction photos and a slick video of the two new residential colleges it is building.

  • The Dartmouth has an article on near-future construction projects.

  • Not much is coming out about Thayer School's master plan. "Because the college owns Tuck Drive, any attempt to better align it with West Street will have to wait until Dartmouth's own building plans in the area are finalized, she said" (referring to Vicki Smith, Hanover’s senior planner) (Valley News).

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Memorial Field’s West Stand as Roman ruin

The Big Green Alert Daily keeps us up to date on Memorial Field with frequent photos of the demolition:

  • The posts of November 20, November 21, and November 26 show demo preparation.
  • The December 5 post shows the slot cut in the concrete cheek wall at the north end. I'd swear those concrete ends were faced in brick at some point.
  • The December 13 post has photos of the bracing. With the removal of the press box, the entry arch has been temporarily returned to its 1920s proportions.
  • The December 14 post has a photo showing the building's original vaulted "chapel" space remaining under the central seats (see also below). It has since been demolished. Oh well.
  • The January 8 post shows demolition just about finished.
  • The January 30 post has information from the builder and photos.

Dartmouth Now has an article on the project, and the athletic department has a time-lapse video of the demolition.

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Neighborhood planning, other topics

  • In 4 Currier, the Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network Innovation Center and New Venture Incubator is operating (NHBR, via Dartmouth Now).

  • The extensive renovation has ended and Triangle House is now open (Dartmouth Now).

  • Amidon Jewelers is closing its store on Main Street, The Dartmouth notes. Amidon has been in town since 1935.

  • The College is looking at using natural gas or another fuel in the Heat Plant in place of No. 6 heating oil (The Dartmouth). It's not clear that this move will lead to a new heating plant on Dewey Field, but there is always the possibility.

  • From Dartmouth Now, "neighborhoods" get a timeline:

    The Board also discussed the ongoing planning and development of possible residential housing models that could be implemented beginning with the Class of 2019.

  • Dunc's Mill, a Vermont rum distillery, displays on its building a rare matched set of Vermont windows (see the post here).

  • The Tucker Foundation is seeking comments on its split into religious and service groups (Dartmouth Now).

  • The Planner's Blog has a post on induced demand for roads.

  • The Dartmouth has a general article on campus construction that says:

    Gilman Hall, the now-closed former home of the biology department and proposed location for the academic center, will remain vacant for the foreseeable future, Hogarty said. Though the College investigated potential uses for the building over the summer, it did not decide on an immediate course of action. While housing was considered as one option, this would have been too expensive.

    With Gilman on the road to weedy dereliction, somebody with FO&M needs to rescue those original lettered transom panels.

  • The Pine Park Association has a video of the construction of the new pedestrian bridge over Girl Brook.

  • Bruce at the Big Green Alert blog justifies his proposed name for the soon-to-be annual season-ending football game against Brown: The Tussle in the Woods.

  • There is some discussion of the Ravine Lodge demolition proposal at Views from the Top.

  • Waterfront New York: Images of the 1920s and '30s is a new book of watercolor paintings by Aldren A. Watson, the Etna illustrator and writer who died in 2013 (Valley News, aldrenwatson.com). Watson might be familiar to readers from the trio of aerial sketches he did for The College on the Hill: A Dartmouth Chronicle (1965), precisely-delineated snapshots of Dartmouth in the 1770s, 1860s, and 1960s. The last of these is etched at a large scale on a glass partition in Six South.

  • There is a new football website (via Big Green Alert blog). In the Athletics > Ivy League section, the green "D" logo has mercifully shed its TM mark.

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The inevitable demolition news

First, the Brown game takes place today. It will be the last game played before Jens Larson's 1923 West Stands at Memorial Field. The steel-framed concrete seating terraces will be demolished and removed from behind the brick facade, which will remain, beginning this week.

Second, The Dartmouth reports that:

The College also plans to rebuild the Ledyard Clubhouse. The clubhouse, which used to house a few students, was vacated last fall following water intrusion and mold buildup. Hogarty said the College will eliminate the residential component when Ledyard is rebuilt.

"Rebuilt" means "replaced," of course. This news has also been a long time coming. Students have been designing replacements for years -- the original 1930 building was designed by a student, in fact -- and the Milone & Macbroom Riverfront Master Plan showed a replacement building in the long term. It is worth mentioning that the Ledyard Monument is not in its original location and so probably needn't be kept where it is.


Ledyard Canoe Club interior photo by Meacham

Interior of Ledyard looking north in 2005

Third, the focus of the article in The Dartmouth is the news that the Moosilauke Ravine Lodge feasibility study recommends demolishing and replacing the Lodge. Maclay Architects, which conducted the study, includes a drawing of the main (west) facade of a possible Ravine Lodge replacement:

detail of Maclay drawing of MRL facade

Detail of Maclay drawing of west facade of new Ravine Lodge

The drawing shows a building that seems both grander and more rustic, or more self-consciously rustic, than the 1938 Lodge. It lacks the extremely broad gable of the old lodge, but it has a signature form of its own. Maclay has extensive timber-framing experience, and with big logs scarce these days, this lodge appears to be a timber-framed building clad in shingles.

The Board of Trustees could decide whether to demolish the old building in the spring.

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Graphic design, history, Friendly’s

  • Take a look at this fascinating 19th-century photograph of the rear of Dartmouth Row. It is dated to the pre-1904 period, but judging from the tents, one might guess that it was taken in 1869, at the time of the centennial celebration. Younger alumni, many of them Civil War vets, were housed here in tents borrowed from the Army. And take a look at the small building on the left -- is that a Temple of Cloacina, an ephemeral outhouse? Middle Fayerweather Hall stands in that area now.

  • The push to apply the nickname "The Woods" to Memorial Field continues (see the Big Green Alert Blog). What about fashioning some of the walls of the replacement stands from board-formed concrete (ConcreteNetwork.com)? What about incorporating a couple of precast concrete columns in the shape of trees?

  • The Rauner Blog has an interesting post on John Smith, a 1773 graduate, Preceptor of Moor's Charity School, early Tutor at Dartmouth, and Trustee.

  • Campus Planning & Facilities has a collection of articles on the Grant.

  • It turns out the football team last spring ran a uniform design contest through the same website that Graduate Studies used to design their coat of arms, 99designs. The winning football uniform design includes lots of Lone Pines, including on the shoulders and the back of the helmet; most interesting is the Pine on the palm of each glove. The design brief says "We would also like to see some designs that incorporate the 'Lone Pine' (pictured below) on the shoulders or in any creative way, similarly to Oregon's 'feathers' on the shoulders of their jerseys." The brief mentions the state motto but not the school motto, strangely.

  • Back in August The Dartmouth had an article on Bruce Wood, maestro of the Big Green Alert site and its blog companion Big Green Alert Daily.

  • The Rauner Blog also has posts on General Thayer's gift of his library; the catalogs of Dartmouth College and Dartmouth University; and an 1829 letter from Joseph Dow describing the college.

  • The Valley News announces that Friendly's in West Leb is closing. I'll never forget the disappointment on the face of a logician friend when he learned that the "ham and turkey pot pies" that our server mentioned among the dinner specials were actually nothing more than ham pot pies and turkey pot pies.

  • Cognitive Marketing designed the Thayer School shield.

  • Check out the May 1957 issue of the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine. The issue features Harrison's initial design for the Hopkins Center. The plan is all there, but the details are changed. The view on pages 22 and 23 shows the long north-south corridor in a different form. The Barrows Rotunda, the cylindrical exhibition space in the front facade? It looks like it was descended from an unroofed two-level glass-walled shaft that features in this 1957 design -- it was meant to go right through the middle of the Top of the Hop.

  • For Larson's prior design for the Hop, see the December 1946 Alumni Magazine, beginning on page 11.

  • Tuck's 2008 visual identity guide is available as a pdf. It's cute that it calls the green color "Tuck green." The book specifies the Sabon and Frutiger typefaces.

  • The athletics Graphic Standards Manual of 2005 is also available as a pdf. Now we know whom to blame for the gigantic TM connected with the green D logo (page 3). It is interesting that in addition to Dartmouth Green (PMS 349 C), this book also defines Dartmouth Black (Pro Black C) (page 11). The primary, "athletic" typeface is not named, but the secondary typeface is specified as Gill Sans Bold.

    The authors of the manual are SME Inc., the firm that created a shield for Manhattan College and the MLS logo with the boot striking the ball. (As an aside, that MLS logo recently was replaced by a shield designed by Athletics and Berliner Benson. A post at Brand New shows the shield partitioned by an almost typographical line that hangs over the border like the tail of a letter Q.)

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    Memorial Field bits seen from the air

    The Valley News has a story on the upcoming demolition of the concrete terraces of the West Stands at Memorial Field.

    The West Stands building was completed in 1923. (Its 19th-century frame predecessor was a big Shingle Style roofed grandstand. It faced the football field and a cinder track. Together the complex was called Alumni Oval.)

    The current project has a fascinating history of its own that includes the casting of concrete structural elements in 2008 before the work was put on hold. From the article:

    Dick Terk, vice president and project manager at Engelberth Construction, a company with offices in Colchester, Vt., and Keene, N.H., remembers getting a call about the west stands project's halt in 2008. It came three days before work was to begin, and he's been looking forward to getting back underway ever since.

    Terk said his company poured about half of the needed concrete pieces back in 2008 and they've been sitting on an old airplane runway at Windsor's Miller Construction Company.

    And here they are, in Google Maps:




    This Google Street View shows what appear to be the terrace risers laid on their sides.

    Ceplikas said $6 million of precast concrete sections have since been stored locally, and that an incentive to get the ball rolling was that New Hampshire building codes are due to change next year.

    "The state revises them every few years and the next time is in 2015," Ceplikas said. "Each time they tweak something, there's a risk that it will make the precast pieces obsolete.["]

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    College Cleaners demo, other items

    • Athletic Director Harry Sheehy interviewed in the Valley News:

      If you talked to our previous coaching staff, we were injured because we had to practice outside, but I don't buy it. I would love to have an indoor facility so you could practice indoors for an hour and outdoors for an hour. I'm not saying the cold doesn't put a stress on the body; I'm just saying that somehow we've had some (men's lacrosse) success before and without an indoor facility.

      I don't need one with a thousand bells and whistles. We need a functional space with an artificial surface. The problem is, it still costs you $20 million just to do that.

    • A Memorial Field bid package document (pdf) states that "[f]or the most part, with the exception of some small changes, this is the same project that was cancelled in 2008."

    • Demolition of the College Cleaners building on Allen Street, where the cleaning business started more than 65 years ago, is going ahead. The building first appears on maps between 1912 and 1922, when it was used as a restaurant. The site will become a parking lot and, one hopes, eventually will be a site for a new commercial building. The Valley News article distinguishes Town-owned from privately-owned public parking; the sad examples of the lots at 2 or 6 West Wheelock, where proper businesses have belonged for decades, suggest that Town-owned lots suffer a certain inertia.

    • Yes, the TM symbol associated with the big green D on the new scoreboard is distracting. But is it also crass, or is it a necessity of college athletics and trademark law? It might be the former: None of the other Ivies feels the need to put such a big TM next to its logo on the league website.

    • A proposal: In order to reduce traffic on South Main Street and at the Inn Corner, the town should make South Main a one-way street and block through traffic other than buses:

      Plan of proposed one-way Main St., half closed to traffic

      The gray zones are areas newly freed up for parking. Some of the southern parking area could become a Town Square in front of the Municipal Building:

      Plan of proposed one-way Main St., half closed to traffic with town square

    • Google Street View says that this bench (Appalachian Trail? Memorial?) appeared at Lebanon and Crosby between 2009 and 2013:



    • Steve Smith has written Top 10 Natural Places to Visit in Hanover, New Hampshire: A Walking Guide (Valley News).

    • Football's alternate uniforms were revealed on August 12 (Big Green Alert). BGA has a photo of "Stephen Dazzo modeling Dartmouth's alternate gray pants and a helmet designed to fit the theme 'Granite of New Hampshire.'"

    • There are some interesting details in the very detailed Wilder Dam relicensing preliminary application document of 2012 (pdf).

    • Another proposal: In order to save money, USPS should sell off its Main Street property and lease a cheaper and more efficient space downtown, perhaps in the Galleria or Hanover Park or even on Allen Street. (This might mean moving the postal sorting operation, with its tractor-trailers, to Route 120.) The college's Real Estate Office or another developer could then rehabilitate all or part of the historic 1931 Post Office building as a commercial space and fill the vacant land around it with commercial or mixed-use construction. It seems so wasteful to maintain that truck parking lot in the middle of town, and the Post Office isn't making the best use of its building, either.

    • The Valley News has stories on Lebanon's sale of school buildings, one with interior photos of Larson's former Junior High School and one with an exterior photo of the building.

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    [Update 09.03.2014: Typo corrected, wording altered for clarity.]

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    In the archives of the Alumni Magazine

    Some fun things are to be found by rummaging indiscriminately in the new on-line archive:

    Harrison's first design for the Hop appeared in a remarkable illustrated article from 1957.1"The Hopkins Center," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (May 1957), 17-21, 25. This is the boxy, pre-arcade version of the building. The Top of the Hop was to have a cylindrical glass-walled void running through its center, all the way from the roof to the theater lobby. This seems to have evolved into the modest Barrows Exhibition Rotunda at the building's entrance.

    Ray Nash wrote on the college seal in 1941.2Ray Nash, "Rediscovering the College Seal," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (December 1941), 17-20. Speaking of the seal, "Hanover's best skylight... is found in Parkhurst Hall" according to a "best-of" list written in 1984.3"Hanover's Bests," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (December 1984), 42. The skylight, which depicted the seal, was removed during a interior renovation and seemed to have been lost by May of 2006. Was it ever returned?

    An article on the Rockefeller Center included architectural commentary by designer Lo-Yi Chan.4Donald McNemar, "Rockefeller Center: The Ideal of Reflection and Action," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (June 1981), 30-33.

    In the election of John Steel to the board of trustees, the alumni association counted its ballots on May 23, 1980. The board put off its vote of June 6, however, asking the association to investigate "any irregularities" in the campaign. On July 28 the association recommended action on the nomination, and the board elected Steel on August 16 — a delay of about ten weeks. He was seated at the board's November meeting.5Editor, "The College. Steel Elected," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (September 1980), 26. Compare Todd Zywicki, "History of Trustee Election Rules," Dartmouth Review (6 October 2006), 2 ("In 1980 a man named John Steel ran as a petition candidate for trustee and was elected in a landslide. Efforts were made by the College and the board at the time to refuse to seat him and after protracted litigation, he finally prevailed.").

    George Hathorn wrote a well-illustrated article on "Unbuilt Dartmouth" in 1978.6George Hathorn, "Unbuilt Dartmouth: Castles in the Clouds," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (May 1978), 29-33.

    The master plan for Memorial Field appeared in a 1920 article.7James P. Richardson, "The Plans for Memorial Field," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (February 1920), 640-643.

    Noel Perrin wrote an observant 1974 photographic study of Hanover-area sprawl.8Noel Perrin, "The College in the Suburb," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (May 1974), 18-23.

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    Notes   [ + ]

    1. "The Hopkins Center," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (May 1957), 17-21, 25.
    2. Ray Nash, "Rediscovering the College Seal," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (December 1941), 17-20.
    3. "Hanover's Bests," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (December 1984), 42.
    4. Donald McNemar, "Rockefeller Center: The Ideal of Reflection and Action," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (June 1981), 30-33.
    5. Editor, "The College. Steel Elected," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (September 1980), 26. Compare Todd Zywicki, "History of Trustee Election Rules," Dartmouth Review (6 October 2006), 2 ("In 1980 a man named John Steel ran as a petition candidate for trustee and was elected in a landslide. Efforts were made by the College and the board at the time to refuse to seat him and after protracted litigation, he finally prevailed.").
    6. George Hathorn, "Unbuilt Dartmouth: Castles in the Clouds," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (May 1978), 29-33.
    7. James P. Richardson, "The Plans for Memorial Field," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (February 1920), 640-643.
    8. Noel Perrin, "The College in the Suburb," Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (May 1974), 18-23.

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    Bus stop construction begins; other items

    • The Innovation Center in 4 Currier has opened (Dartmouth Now). The design appears to be by Truex Cullins, who did the original building.

    • A little film introduces Perdido, the new sculpture on East Wheelock.

    • The Alumni Magazine has put up its electronic archive of every issue since the October 1905 Dartmouth Bi-Monthly, edited by E.M. Hopkins.

    • The post here on the topic of the new bus stop at the Hop complained about the sidewalk in front of the Inn. It turns out that that area is going to be reworked as well (Dartmouth Now). The sidewalk is growing, according to DCREO associate director of real estate Tim McNamara:

      The planned changes to the sidewalk and surrounding areas will effectively create two lanes as well as smoothing out the frost-heaved sections of sidewalk.

      "At present, pedestrians walking down East Wheelock have to pass under the porte-cochère," says McNamara. "We will relocate the sidewalk to the outside of the porte-cochère so that pedestrians will not conflict with cars and guests coming and going from the Inn."

      Moving the curb line out beyond the street's current shoulder will also allow expansion of the Inn's outdoor dining.

    • The Hopkins Center's iconic Moore Theatre facade is also getting new double-pane windows (Dartmouth Now) ahead of the planned expansion and renovation. The D has a photo. (The Planner's Blog has a post on the project)

    • Lebanon Junior High (J.F. Larson) is being renovated and reused, in part as the Spark Community Center. Studio Nexus is working on the building.

    • Project VetCare has purchased the 1907 house at 80 Lebanon Street and plans to rent rooms to three or more student veterans (Valley News). It's the brown bungalow at the center of this Bing bird's-eye view.

    • More great aerials: the Shower Towers and Kiewit, showing the committed but incongruous Bradley Plaza, and a 1919 photo of the Green showing the big tent set up for the 150th anniversary celebration. Most intriguing are this aerial and this aerial of Dartmouth Hall on fire in 1935. That was the fire that led Larson to gut the 1906 building and insert new floors and interiors, and to put up the current belfry and the three front gables showing the notable years.

    • One is relieved to see the College Usher (Dean of Libraries Jeffrey Horrell) identified as such in a Commencement photo showing him carrying Lord Dartmouth's Cup.

    • A tidbit from the biography of the late David McLaughlin, Dartmouth President from 1981 to 1987. On the elimination of fraternities and sororities:

      In hindsight, I am convinced that the wrong approach was taken. Having been in a unique position to restructure the fraternity system, I should1David T. McLaughlin with Howard J. Coffin, Choices Made (Hanover, N.H.: Privately printed 2007), 135. have been more decisive early in my presidency, during my "Honeymoon" period. Perhaps I could and should have eliminated the fraternities in their current form and redefined them — brought about some positive fundamental restructuring of the campus social system. Neither my predecessor nor my successors had such a golden opportunity, both being non-Dartmouth alumni and academics and, therefore, suspect from the outset, by alumni and students, as men having little, if any, use for the Greek system. But football-playing, fraternity-member David McLaughlin was a different story. Oh, the howling would have been long and loud, and many on the board would undoubtedly have opposed me, but I believe that I could have brought a majority of my fellow trustees along with me. What I should have said, quite emphatically, in that inaugural speech of mine was, "Dartmouth needs to dismantle fraternities as they exist today."2David T. McLaughlin with Howard J. Coffin, Choices Made (Hanover, N.H.: Privately printed 2007), 136.

    • The Hood now has put up a page on the expansion, with no new info since June 11.

    • Memorial Field construction is set to begin November 17 and finish by September 1 (Planning Board minutes pdf).

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    [Update 07.29.2014: Link to Planner's Blog post added.]

    [Update 07.22.2014: Link to photo of Hop windows added.]

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    Notes   [ + ]

    1. David T. McLaughlin with Howard J. Coffin, Choices Made (Hanover, N.H.: Privately printed 2007), 135.
    2. David T. McLaughlin with Howard J. Coffin, Choices Made (Hanover, N.H.: Privately printed 2007), 136.

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