Changes continue at Memorial Field, even after completion

Dartmouth Sports has a press release for the completion of the West Stands, and the Big Green Alert Blog has been publishing photos all along, including on July 1, August 19, and September 24 (completion, and the first interior views).

The Valley News article on the Lone Pine logo contained this intriguing note:

Searching for a concept to provide a sort of mental home-field advantage for his troops, Teevens came up with the idea of “The Woods” a few years back. He once coached at the University of Florida, where the football field is known as “The Swamp” and decided something similar should grace Memorial Field. The nickname is used in promotional materials and videos, and plans are in the works for the phrase and the Lone Pine logo to be painted on the facade of the refurbished west stands.

One hopes that the school’s architectural office, the Office of Design, gives the football team some design assistance here.

It is difficult to tell from photos alone whether the designers had a part in relocating the constellation of plaques that has moved from the War Memorial Garden at the Hop to Memorial Field (see the photo at Big Green Alert).

The stands were built as a First World War memorial, of course, and the memorial heart of the building was the high-vaulted, open entrance chamber of limestone and brick. That memorial room has been demolished; it is understandable that Dartmouth could not afford to preserve the building’s entry, or that the openings were too narrow for the new stairs. The college did salvage the small number of First World War plaques from the walls and has put them up again in circumstances that seem somewhat less reverential than before.

As a generic all-wars memorial, the stands feature a green wall — is it painted concrete, or painted wood? — with some plaques1 attached — including the Class of 1945 Weather Post plaque, apparently separated now from its temperature and pressure dials. This building does seem to be a good place to relocate the plaques if the upcoming Hop expansion requires the use of the garden space. One hopes that the plaques were not moved here for thematic reasons alone.

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  1. One does miss the old tradition of putting the date of dedication on a plaque. Attention to wording also seems to be declining: One noble plaque, generously given by surviving classmates, honors the “men who served in WWII and those who gave their lives for their country,” implying that those who gave their lives did not serve, and omitting an indication of the category to which the 24 names belong.

Official Hood renderings on the way

In the Hood’s Fall Quarterly (pdf), Interim Director Juliette Bianco writes of

the College’s exciting expansion and renovation of the Hood building with architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien. The finishing touches of the design development phase of the project will happen this fall, and we look forward to sharing renderings of what the new gallery, teaching, and lobby spaces may look like as we prepare for groundbreaking in mid-2016—look for this news […] in the winter 2016 issue of the Hood Quarterly.

This weekend’s Alumni Council meeting will include a discussion called “Hood Museum Expansion: A Case Study in Capital Project Development at Dartmouth.” The speakers will be Bianco, Lisa Hogarty, vice president of Campus Services, and Bob Lasher ’88, senior vice president for Advancement.


More on the Lone Pine logo

The Valley News has a piece by Tris Wykes on the growing use of the Lone Pine in athletic branding. See also the article “Stand Tall Lone Pine” (Peak (Winter 2015) pdf).

John Scotford [one letter t in his name] designed the pine for the 1969 Bicentennial. The school actually released several different versions or iterations of the logo, and several different representations of a pine tree, most if not all apparently by Scotford:

Bicentennial dual logo

Bicentennial dual logo from a program(?)

Bicentennial medal obverse

Bicentennial medal, obverse

Bicentennial tile

Bicentennial commemorative tile

Bicentennial logo

Third Century logo from frontispiece of R.N. Hill, College on the Hill

Of course the actual Lone Pine — earlier known as the Old Pine, although it was not extremely old, certainly not as old as the school — did not look like any of these, but that is beside the point. (Scotford also designed the 1969 Dartmouth College Case stamp, a realistic image that does not depict any pines.)

With the rise of the pine, apparently the athletic logotype commissioned from SME, Inc. in 2005 (pdf) is going away.1

Logo by SME, Inc.


Athletics logo by SME, Inc.

That logo is completely skipped over by the VN article, which goes from the Big Green nickname (dating to the early 1900s,2 not a replacement for the later Indians nickname) right to the Lone Pine. Neither the Athletic Department’s improving website nor the Football Team’s website uses it.

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  1. This is good news. I could never figure out that logo. Is the triangular background form meant to represent the gable of Dartmouth Hall? Then why make its essential peak tiny and hide it inside the letter D, where it gets lost on banners and uniforms and Web graphics? But then the upper part of the shape cannot be Dartmouth Hall, because the lower part of the shape is an upward-broadening trapezoid. There is no building at Dartmouth like that.
  2. The Dartmouth 31:__ (___, 1909), 206 (Google Books). Football games between Dartmouth and the “Indians” of the Carlisle Indian School of the 1910s were called Dartmouth-Indian games — a clear indication that Dartmouth teams were not the Indians.

Thayer new building details

Thayer School news from the Valley News:

In 2017, administrators hope to break ground on a new building for the Thayer School of Engineering, located near the Tuck School of Business at the western end of campus.

Joseph Helble, dean of the Thayer School, said the expansion would help to accommodate rising numbers of students and faculty, as well as increased need for lab and office space.

“Our undergraduate enrollments have grown tremendously, roughly doubling over the past 5 years, so we are in need of more classroom space, including ‘project labs’ where students work on open-ended, hands-on design projects, usually in teams,” he said in an email Sunday.

The new building would be built in place of the parking lot south of the Thayer complex, according to Hogarty, who said the cost of the project had not been fixed but was planned to come entirely through donations.


Hood expansion planning progress?

Hood Museum main courtyard, Meacham photo

The Hood Museum’s main courtyard, looking north

A June presentation of the expansion plans confirmed that the Hood’s courtyard will be largely enclosed. The sequence of spaces that begins with that grim portal will be missed; one hopes that some elements can be preserved, even if as freestanding sculpture elsewhere. The passage that is left alongside the Hop here should not be allowed to become a dark tunnel. The word is that the south facade of the museum, visible from Lebanon Street, will not be changed.

Related: A recent visit to the historic market in Roanoke, Va. showed that Moore’s neon interventions (post) were all gone.


Indoor Practice Facility at the “Sunken Garden”?

Bruce Wood at BGA wrote a week ago Saturday about the inflatible stadium bubbles that some schools use for offseason sports practice:

Keep your eyes and ears peeled for news out of Dartmouth and it won’t be about a bubble. Those who attended the Friends of Football semiannual meeting in June heard the details but nothing has been officially released yet.

A guess: The news will be about the Indoor Practice Facility slated for the practice field beyond Thompson and the Boss Tennis Center. Almost four years ago the Alumni Magazine wrote that “Sheehy’s hopes for the future include the building of an indoor practice facility[.]”1

The designers of the future facility are Sasaki Associates, the firm that has been working on the “residential colleges” plan.

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  1. Brad Parks, “It’s a Whole New Ballgame,” Dartmouth Alumni Magazine (Nov.-Dec. 2011).

History, buildings, etc.

  • The Rauner blog has posts on Memorial Field, dorm room plans, fraternity meeting minutes, the WWI trenches around Leverone’s site, and class day clay pipes.

  • A Review interview with Thayer School’s Senior Associate Dean Ian Baker says:

    In addition to serving as the Associate Dean, Baker also chaired a community board overseeing and discussing the construction of a new building for the engineering school. The new building will be located next to MacLean where the parking lot is. “We have yet to figure out where the car park goes,” Baker mentioned, wryly suggesting that it was the only problem in the plan. Baker also serves on several academic boards for the school.

    The trustees approved a Thayer School parking garage on the Cummings Lot site back in February of 2002 (post).

  • An actual historic preservation campaign has sprung up at Dartmouth: Save Moosilauke.

  • The 65 Bunkhouse is finished, photos of the decication.

  • Nice black-and-white photos of Hanover architecture by Trevor Labarge are on line. The post office pediment looks quite grand, almost Londonesque.

  • The Hanover Conservancy is thinking about Kendal’s expansion onto the Chieftain property

  • The Valley News is covering the ongoing negotiations over construction of a palliative care center near DHMC and Boston Lot Lake.

  • The Williamson seems to be wrapping up (2014 press release, Turner Construction page).

  • ORW Landscape Architects and Planners of WRJ has been acquired by Greenman – Pedersen, Inc. of New York (pdf). ORW designed the recent improvements to the sidewalk and porte-cochere of the Inn (pdf).

  • The Norwich ad firm called Flannel created Dartmouth’s polished Strategic Plan website and others.

  • The story of how Glasgow football club Partick Thistle F.C. (Wiki) got its new mascot is almost as odd as the mascot itself.

  • Old Division Football (“the Usual Game”) seems a bit like the Florentine calcio storico (New York Times).


Heraldica

1. The Lone Pine really is taking over from the 1940s-1950s shield as an emblem of official college-related things other than the board of trustees.

The pine is everywhere. For example, the Campus Police were represented by this patch but now Safety & Security are using this one. A van from Computing Services (now called ITS?) features a pine dissolving into pixels. Each of the new shields of Thayer School and Grad Studies has a pine. The new-ish DDS logo presents the Lone Pine as a giant piece of broccoli. Peak magazine (Winter 2015) even has an article on the phenomenon.

2. If the residential colleges adopt coats of arms, the collection of all six will look neat together. Here’s a collaged image of the carved and painted arms of the city of Dresden, flanked by those of the city’s districts, created to honor the 30th anniversary of the establishment of the DDR in 1979:

Dresden, Germany arms. Meacham photo

3. This is not directly related, but it’s worth remembering that a portion of the money that Wheelock used to establish Dartmouth came from Merton College, Oxford (Wiki; arms shown on 1264 Society page). The college is listed as having donated £2.2s.- to Moor’s Charity School during Occom’s and Whitaker’s 1766-1767 fundraising tour of England and Scotland (appendix to Wheelock’s 1769 Narrative in Google Books).

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Update 08.25.2015: Take a look at the Flag Project at the Florianopolis Design Biennale — a whole series of flags, each one representing the architectural features of a particular building.


Moosilauke schematic design

The new project page for the Ravine Lodge replacement links to a pdf of the schematic design.

The new design seems to recognize that the building’s “rear” facade, which faces away from the road, is its most prominent side.

Within the dining room is a great cairn-like chimney. Projecting from two sides of the chimney is a Swiss-Family-Robinson style cantilevered balcony or mezzanine. The stair to reach this mezzanine is located inside the chimney. It’s not clear how convincing the fireplace will be…


House professors’ dwelling sites selected

The Valley News reports on the sites of the six dwellings of the house professors. (Each of the future “residential colleges,” also called “residential communities,” “houses,” and sometimes “clusters,” will have a resident professor.) Correlated with what are presumed to be the corresponding residential communities, the sites are:

  1. The existing Frost House (White House), part of the East Wheelock Cluster. (The continued use of this house is only implied in the article.)

  2. A new house at 16 Webster Avenue. The college will build a “two-story, three-bedroom building of about 3,000 square feet with an attached two-car garage” on vacant land west of the President’s House. Street View. This house presumably will serve the Russell Sage cluster.

  3. A new house at 5 Sanborn Road, near the Howe Library. This house and its southern yard will occupy the site of 18 East South Street, a corner house demolished recently, as well as 5 Sanborn Road, a house slated for demolition (June 2 Planning Board meeting minutes pdf). Street View. This house presumably will serve the Topliff cluster.

  4. The existing house at 2 Clement Road, a Tudorbethan cottage behind LALACS. Street View. This house presumably will serve the McLaughlin cluster, although it is not close by.

  5. A new house at 12 Allen Street, next to Panarchy. “On the corner of School Street and Allen Street, the college owns land zoned for three single-family homes, on which it plans to build two residences with a shared backyard.” According to June 2 Planning Board meeting minutes (pdf), “[t]he ravine will be filled to create a lot with less topographic relief. Tim shared a little history about the lot. A person had excavated a cave in the side of the ravine and lived there for some time.” Street View. One of the two new residences presumably will serve the Mass Row cluster, blocks away.

  6. The existing house at 3 ½ North Park Street, a rambling Victorian dwelling across from Triangle House. Street View. By process of elimination, this house is presumed to serve the Fayers cluster, although it is closer to East Wheelock.

The college plans to begin site work on the new buildings in the fall “and may break ground as soon as next spring” (this and all other unattributed quotations are from the VN article).

Some of these houses are quite distant from the clusters they are meant to serve; perhaps this is only an interim step, useful during the ten or twelve years before a major gift allows the construction of a permanent (non-prefab) dwelling within the bounds of each Residential Community.


The Houses and retroactive alumnification

A new deanship under an old name — Dean of the College — now oversees the creation of the house system.1

One of the new House Professors, Ryan Hickox, said recently:

In addition to the House Professors, House members will also include faculty, postdocs, graduate students, staff, alumni, and other associates of Dartmouth, so that the Houses become a true cross-section of Dartmouth in which we all take part in activities and traditions together.2

All kinds of interesting questions for the new Dean are popping up:

  • What will the Houses be named? (See some suggestions posted here in June.)

  • Will graduates march according to House affiliation at Commencement?

  • Which of Houses will put its House Professor in a modular dwelling, and how soon does the college plan to replace these structures? (See the May post here.)

  • Will a knowledgeable designer create a coat of arms for each House, as at Yale?3

  • Will any landscape changes accompany the building alterations? A few territorial walls could have a large effect on identity.

  • Will pre-2016 graduates be assigned to Houses after the fact? This question was prompted by Professor Hickox’s statement. Once the House identities are set, the college would seem to have a great opportunity to invite every alum to formally affiliate with a particular house. The Houses with the newest buildings, such as East Wheelock and especially McLaughlin, would have comparably youthful Old Members — another way in which the Houses would become differentiated notwithstanding the random assignment of New Members.


Good's proposed Dartmouth arms

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  1. Priya Ramaiah, “Rebecca Biron Appointed Dean of the College,” The Dartmouth (26 June 2015), available at http://thedartmouth.com/2015/06/26/rebecca-biron-appointed-dean-of-the-college/ (viewed 1 July 2015).
  2. Ryan Hickox, interviewed by Kush S. Desai in “Inside the Mind of a House Professor,” The Dartmouth Review (12 June 2015), at http://www.dartreview.com/in-the-mind-of-a-housing-professor/ (viewed 1 July 2015).
  3. Richard Hand Parke, “Yale Keeps Alive Art of Heraldry,” New York Times (31 May 1964), available at http://www.nytimes.com/1964/05/31/yale-keeps-alive-art-of-heraldry.html?_r=0 (viewed 1 July 2015). If students are invited to come up with their own heraldry, they must obey High School Heraldry Rule No. 1: The shield shall feature a clip-art lamp as the symbol of knowledge.

Newsilauke Ravine Lodge

The college has released four watercolor sketches of the future Ravine Lodge replacement (see also the accompanying Dartmouth Now announcement; the Valley News has a story). The building depicted looks similar to the one that was shown in the sketch posted here back in November 2014.

As is always said, although the demolition is regrettable, if the Lodge is to be replaced, this looks like a good replacement. The designers have taken care to depict a number of existing signs and other decorative elements. The stone foundations and footings should be more attractive and characteristic of Mt. Moosilauke than the current 1939 concrete walls. The massive stone mountain of a chimney structure looks like it could be interesting.